Please ensure Javascript is enabled for purposes of website accessibility

EXTENSION CONNECTION: Chaste trees are great within a landscape

CRESTVIEW — The showy chaste tree makes an attractive specimen as the  centerpiece of your landscape bed or in a large container on the deck.

Much more of them are being seen since the Florida Department of Transportation has recognized the tree as a desirable median planting.

Easy-to-grow, drought resistant, and attractive to butterflies and bees, the chaste tree is a multi-stemmed small tree with fragrant, upwardly-pointing lavender blooms and gray-green foliage.

Easy to grow, drought resistant, and attractive to butterflies and bees, Vitex agnus-castus is a multi-stemmed small tree with fragrant, upwardly-pointing lavender blooms and gray-green foliage. The chaste tree’s palmately divided leaves resemble those of the marijuana (Cannabis sativa) plant; its flowers can be mistaken for butterfly bush (Buddleia sp.); and the dry, darkened drupes can be used for seasoning, similar to black pepper, making it a conversation piece for those unfamiliar with the tree.

Vitex, with its sage-scented leaves that were once believed to have a sedative effect, has the common name “Chastetree” since Athenian women used the leaves in their beds to keep themselves chaste during the feasts of Ceres, a Roman festival held on April 12.

In modern times, the tree is more often planted where beekeepers visit in order to promote excellent honey production, or simply included in the landscape for the enjoyment of its showy, summer display of violet panicles.

The chaste tree is native to woodlands and dry areas of southern Europe and western Asia. It will thrive in almost any soil that has good drainage, prefers full sun or light shade, and can even tolerate moderate salt air.

The sage-scented leaves of the chaste tree were once believed to have a sedative effect. It is more often planted where beekeepers visit in order to promote excellent honey production, or simply included in the landscape for its showy, summer display of violet panicles.

Vitex is a sprawling plant that grows 10 to 20 feet high and wide, that looks best unpruned. If pruning is desired to control the size, it should be done in the winter, since it is a deciduous tree and the blooms form on new wood.

The chaste tree can take care of itself, but can be pushed to faster growth with light applications of fertilizer in spring and early summer and by mulching around the plant.

There are no pests of major concern associated with this species, but root rot can cause decline in soils that are kept too moist.

Sheila Dunning

Sheila Dunning is an agent at the University of Florida's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Extension office in Crestview.

This article originally appeared on Crestview News Bulletin: EXTENSION CONNECTION: Chaste trees are great within a landscape